Equiniti pushes for IT careers to receive higher acclaim

Mon 15 Sep 2014

Equiniti calls for IT careers to receive level professional playing field of respect as demand outstrips supply

Equiniti, a specialist in technology, financial and administrative services, says if young people are to be motivated in choosing technology related degrees and professions, IT careers must be given the same respect as professions such as law, accounting and architecture.

According to Equiniti, demand is outstripping supply as established and fast growing tech firms compete for skilled workers.

As a nationwide employer with 3000 associates engaged in a wide variety of technology related positions, Equiniti takes innovative steps to engage, mentor and recruit young people.

Equiniti ICS employed 20 interns in 2013 with 14 completing their development and 12 converted into employees - an 86% conversion rate.

Pancredit part of the Equiniti group,  employs from ‘Yorkshire Graduates’ – a graduate recruitment service, all of whom have computing and technology related degrees are specialising in coding and programming.

In the South of England, Equiniti’s complaints handling specialists ‘Hazell Carr’ has recruited 500 IT graduates from Liverpool, Chester and Manchester Universities, all of whom have been mentored and many of whom are progressing quickly in their careers.

The Pension Solutions division of Equiniti has also recently employed graduates into System Development roles and has a number of STEM ambassadors who visit schools and colleges to help teachers to bring these subjects to life in the classroom.

Not everyone needs to enter the industry as a graduate. Equiniti’s Belfast office has partnered up with regional colleges to provide BTEC students with intern programmes to broaden employment within the IT industry.

Research carried out by the Department for Business innovation and skills, analysed how STEM (Science, Technology, Economics and Maths) subjects are perceived by young people on social media. The terms ‘geek’ and ‘boring’ were mentioned frequently online to describe technology based subjects. These findings have suggested that the perception of such subjects are not so positive. A perception change needs to occur, if students are to willingly pursue a career in technology.

Charlie Tuxworth, Director of Software and Innovation, Equiniti ICS, says: “Software engineering is too often not considered to be a profession in the same way as other careers such as accountancy, teaching or architecture. As this is a massive growth area across the UK we are keen to see more parents encouraging their children to look at the STEM subjects, and to consider IT related careers. The IT industry is one where there are no limits to what can be achieved by people with great ideas. Not everyone is going to invent the next Google or Facebook, but as technologies and ideas move at a rapid pace, the opportunities are definitely there.”